Monthly Archives: November 2015

Sunrise in Toronto

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The 2015 Canadian Election in Pictures

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau holds his son Hadrien as he exits a campaign rally in Brampton

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau holds his son Hadrien as he exits a campaign rally in Brampton

This year I had the chance to cover the most important process in politics, a federal election. I will not get into politics in this post, but I did want to share a few thoughts on what it’s like to cover and election. For the last week of the election, I was with the Conservative party of Canada and their leader, Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Harper would be defeated by Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, the son of the late former Prime Minister, Pierre Trudeau.

Over the years of covering Stephen Harper as a Prime Minister, he has always been very controlled and rehearsed when it came time to photograph him. Most of the time, the access granted to journalists and cameras were very sparse. A photo op with Harper often involved being hours early, while you were kept in a holding spot, and then quickly ushered into whatever room or area to photograph him when he and his team were ready. The impression I had is that Harper did not like being in front of cameras for any period of time, in case something went wrong, or something unpredictable happened, ultimately losing control over the situation.

Justin Trudeau does seem to be quite the opposite from Stephen Harper. He plays well to the camera, and rolls with the punches it seems. During his campaign events, unpredictability doesn’t seem to be an issue. Access to him is much more relaxed, and he is much less controlling with his image. However, I do wonder if as Prime Minister of Canada, if he will continue to give access to the press like he did during his election campaign. As they say, the honeymoon is over, and we will see if he grants the same level of access to the press as he did on his way to winning.

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks at a campaign rally in Brampton

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks at a campaign rally in Brampton

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks as he campaigns in Mississauga.

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks as he campaigns in Mississauga.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau arrives at a campaign rally in Brampton.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau arrives at a campaign rally in Brampton.

Liberal Party of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau poses before he spars at the Paul Brown Boxfit boxing gym in Toronto, August 6, 2015. Trudeau, who won headlines in 2012 by whipping a Conservative senator in a charity boxing match, will try to prove he's a heavyweight in the political arena in Canada's first electoral debate on Thursday. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.

Liberal Party of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau poses before he spars at the Paul Brown Boxfit boxing gym in Toronto, August 6, 2015. Trudeau, who won headlines in 2012 by whipping a Conservative senator in a charity boxing match, will try to prove he’s a heavyweight in the political arena in Canada’s first electoral debate on Thursday. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaks at a news conference in Richmond Hill, Ontario, January 30, 2015. Canada's main spy agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), will get new powers aimed at disrupting potential terror attacks under security legislation unveiled on Friday.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaks at a news conference in Richmond Hill, Ontario, January 30, 2015. Canada’s main spy agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), will get new powers aimed at disrupting potential terror attacks under security legislation unveiled on Friday.

Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaks as he is displayed in a viewfinder of a television camera during a campaign stop at the WaterStone Estate and Farms in King Township, Ontario, August 20, 2015.

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaks as he is displayed in a viewfinder of a television camera during a campaign stop at the WaterStone Estate and Farms in King Township, Ontario, August 20, 2015.

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau (L), Conservative leader and Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Thomas Mulcair (R) take part in the Munk leaders' debate on Canada's foreign policy in Toronto, Canada September 28, 2015.

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau (L), Conservative leader and Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Thomas Mulcair (R) take part in the Munk leaders’ debate on Canada’s foreign policy in Toronto, Canada September 28, 2015.

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper hugs a young boy during a campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper hugs a young boy during a campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Supporters hold signs at Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper's campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Supporters hold signs at Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper’s campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in London, Ontario, October 13, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Dino Ari, a local restaurant owner, holds up cash as he takes part in a skit as he  illustrating how much the Conservatives say will cost small business owners in taxes under an elected Liberal government, at Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper's campaign rally at William F. White International Inc, a stage lighting equipment supplier in Etobicoke, a suburb of Toronto, October 13, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Dino Ari, a local restaurant owner, holds up cash as he takes part in a skit as he illustrating how much the Conservatives say will cost small business owners in taxes under an elected Liberal government, at Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper’s campaign rally at William F. White International Inc, a stage lighting equipment supplier in Etobicoke, a suburb of Toronto, October 13, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Supporters holds signs as Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks at a campaign event at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Supporters holds signs as Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks at a campaign event at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A young girl kisses a young boy as they await Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper to attend a campaign event at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A young girl kisses a young boy as they await Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper to attend a campaign event at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Conservative supports stand behind a table holding a pile of cash, illustrating how much the Conservatives say will cost families in taxes under an elected Liberal government, during a campaign event held by Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015.

Conservative supports stand behind a table holding a pile of cash, illustrating how much the Conservatives say will cost families in taxes under an elected Liberal government, during a campaign event held by Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper at the Martin Family Fruit Farm in Waterloo, October 12, 2015.

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper (C) tours the pumpkin patch during a wagon ride at Whittamore Farms in Richmond Hill, October 11, 2015.

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper (C) tours the pumpkin patch during a wagon ride at Whittamore Farms in Richmond Hill, October 11, 2015.

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper tours the pumpkin patch at Whittamore Farms with his wife Laureen (L), son Benjamin (R), and daughter Rachel (2nd L) in Richmond Hill, October 11, 2015.

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper tours the pumpkin patch at Whittamore Farms with his wife Laureen (L), son Benjamin (R), and daughter Rachel (2nd L) in Richmond Hill, October 11, 2015.

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper visits supporters at Heritage Coffee‎, a coffee packaging warehouse in London, Ontario, October 14, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper visits supporters at Heritage Coffee‎, a coffee packaging warehouse in London, Ontario, October 14, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A supporter holds up a sign that reads "Economy #1 Priority" during Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper's campaign event at J.P. Bowman, a tool and die facility, in Brantford, Ontario, October 14, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A supporter holds up a sign that reads “Economy #1 Priority” during Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper’s campaign event at J.P. Bowman, a tool and die facility, in Brantford, Ontario, October 14, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Laureen Harper, wife of Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper, dances with actor Vinay Virmani (L) at a rally with the South Asian community in Brampton, Ontario, October 14, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Laureen Harper, wife of Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper, dances with actor Vinay Virmani (L) at a rally with the South Asian community in Brampton, Ontario, October 14, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Security detail and media personnel stand on the tarmac in front of Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper's campaign plane in Toronto, Ontario, October 15, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Security detail and media personnel stand on the tarmac in front of Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper’s campaign plane in Toronto, Ontario, October 15, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in Thetford Mines, Quebec, October 15, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in Thetford Mines, Quebec, October 15, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper and his wife Laureen look over the view in old Quebec City, October 16, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper and his wife Laureen look over the view in old Quebec City, October 16, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A young girl in the audience looks up as Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in Quebec City, October 16, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

A young girl in the audience looks up as Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a campaign rally in Quebec City, October 16, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper takes a "selfie" with people as he hands out coffee at a Tim Horton's restaurant in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 16, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper takes a “selfie” with people as he hands out coffee at a Tim Horton’s restaurant in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 16, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper gets off the campaign plane with daughter Rachel (L), son Benjamin (R), and his wife Laureen (2nd R) at the airport in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 16, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper gets off the campaign plane with daughter Rachel (L), son Benjamin (R), and his wife Laureen (2nd R) at the airport in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 16, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper boards his campaign plane in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 17, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper boards his campaign plane in Fredericton, New Brunswick, October 17, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a rally at a school in Laval, Quebec, October 17, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks during a rally at a school in Laval, Quebec, October 17, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper kisses his wife Laureen at a rally in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper kisses his wife Laureen at a rally in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he gives his concession speech after Canada's federal election in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he gives his concession speech after Canada’s federal election in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper leaves his rally as former Toronto Mayor and current city councillor Rob Ford looks on in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper leaves his rally as former Toronto Mayor and current city councillor Rob Ford looks on in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Former Toronto Mayor and current city councillor Rob Ford and his wife Renata leave Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper's rally  in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Former Toronto Mayor and current city councillor Rob Ford and his wife Renata leave Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper’s rally in Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper leaves his bus to board his campaign plane in Toronto, Ontario, October 18, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper leaves his bus to board his campaign plane in Toronto, Ontario, October 18, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks at rally on the tarmac at the airport in Regina, Saskatchewan , October 18, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper speaks at rally on the tarmac at the airport in Regina, Saskatchewan , October 18, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper steps out of the campaign plane with his wife Laureen (2nd L), son Benjamin (L), and his daughter Rachel (R) at a campaign rally inside a hangar in Abbotsford, British Columbia, October 18, 2015.  Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19.   REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister and Conservative leader Stephen Harper steps out of the campaign plane with his wife Laureen (2nd L), son Benjamin (L), and his daughter Rachel (R) at a campaign rally inside a hangar in Abbotsford, British Columbia, October 18, 2015. Canadians will go to the polls for a federal election on October 19. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper kisses his wife Laureen before giving his concession speech after Canada's federal election in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015.  Harper will resign as leader of the Conservative party following its crushing defeat to the Liberals in Monday's election, the Conservatives said in a statement.REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper kisses his wife Laureen before giving his concession speech after Canada’s federal election in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015. Harper will resign as leader of the Conservative party following its crushing defeat to the Liberals in Monday’s election, the Conservatives said in a statement.REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Toronto Blue Jays ALDS

Texas Rangers' Delino DeShields slides safe into home plate past Toronto Blue Jays' catcher Russell Martin during third inning of game one American League Division Series play Oct 8, 2015 in Toronto.

Texas Rangers’ Delino DeShields slides safe into home plate past Toronto Blue Jays’ catcher Russell Martin during third inning of game one American League Division Series play Oct 8, 2015 in Toronto.

Covering a Blue Jays baseball playoff series was especially exciting as a long time Blue Jays fan. I had to a miss a big chunk of it as I had to cover the Canadian elections, but here is a frame that came from a remote camera from a play at the plate. This turned out to be me favourite image from the games I got to cover.